The Economics of Open Access

“Establishing open access … requires the active commitment of each and every individual producer of scientific knowledge and holder of cultural heritage.” —Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities In my last post, I talked about Open Access and the Library of Congress, which is an essential resource for my work. Today, I explain my […]

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The Shutdown of Public Knowledge

“…to further the progress of knowledge and creativity for the benefit of the American people.” –Mission of the Library of Congress When the United States government shutdown last night, I did not expect it would have an immediate effect on the Isis Bibliography. Today, I found that I was wrong. My staff and I access the Library of Congress website […]

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Isis Articles as a Big Data Source

I’ve already called attention to the work that Scott Weingart (Indiana University) has done with co-citation analysis in history of science in my earlier post on the 2013 Digital HPS Conference. If you go to his blog, the scottbot irregular, you’ll find a post from this week where he talks about how to do visualizations with co-citation analysis using the […]

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Print or digital?

Over my years as editor of the Isis Bibliography, periodically people will ask me about whether or not it is time to go all digital. “Is the era of printed bibliographies over?” they wonder. After all, a database does a much better job of searching the cumulative data going back forty years. When responding to them, my answers have been […]

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At the International Congress: Open Access and the Ecology of Knowledge

In my post a couple of weeks ago, I mentioned that I would discuss events at the International Congress of History of Science at Manchester (ICHSTM 2013). The session that I co-organized with Birute Railiene (president of the the International Union’s Commission on Bibliography and Documentation) brought together a group of speakers who have been studying or providing digital reference […]

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Digital Humanities in History and Philosophy of Science

This past weekend, I attended the Digital HPS conference hosted by Bill Newman and Wally Hooper on the beautiful Indiana University campus in Bloomington. The conference was, I believe, the fourteenth meeting of a group of historians and philosophers of science who are building digital tools and doing cutting edge “big data” research. They have formed the Digital HPS Consortium. […]

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